Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission

Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission
Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission
Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission
Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission
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Load image into Gallery viewer, Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission
Load image into Gallery viewer, Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission

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Transient Lunar Phenomena Reports from the Lunar International Observers Network During the Apollo 11 Mission

Transient lunar phenomena refer to short-lived light, color or other changes in appearance of the Moon’s surface. Claims of observations of these phenomena date back to at least 1,000 years, with some having been observed independently by multiple witnesses or reputable scientists. This rare book serves as a meticulous record of such observations made during the Apollo 11 mission. During the mission in July 1969, Houston radioed to Apollo 11: "We've got an observation you can make if you have some time up there. There's been some lunar transient events reported in the vicinity of Aristarchus." Astronomers in Bochum, West Germany, had observed a bright glow on the lunar surface—the same sort of eerie luminescence that has intrigued Moon watchers for centuries. The report was passed on to Houston and thence to the astronauts. Almost immediately, Michael Collins reported back: "Hey, Houston, I'm looking north up toward Aristarchus now, and there's an area that is considerably more illuminated than the surrounding area. It seems to have a slight amount of fluorescence."

Cambridge, MA: Smithsonian Institution Center for Short-Lived Phenomena, 1969. Stapled wrappers, pp. (iv), 159. About very good, with shelfwear and minor discoloration to wraps, title written in black ink on spine, internally clean with no markings. Very scarce.

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